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Swapping System Drive Letters in Dual Boot Setup

Question: Swapping System Drive Letters in Dual Boot Setup

I set up an XP/Win7 dual boot system using 2 partitions on a single hard disk (XP was pre-installed). All seemed to go smoothly, except for the fact that I couldn't boot from the Win7 DVD for some reason. The process would start loading files from the DVD but would keep stalling just after the progress bar got to 100% and disappeared. After several attempts and trying 2 different DVD drives, I ended up just running the Win7 setup.exe from XP and that got the install completed.

The problem is when I boot into Win7 the system drive is designated as "W:\" not "C:\" ("W" is the letter I assigned to it when creating the partition that would hold Win7). I hate this. Some people mentioned in different how-to's I checked out that their dual boot system automatically designates the system drive as "C:\" regardless of which OS they boot into or partition letters assigned to each OS. How can I get that to work?

Everything else seems to be working properly when in either XP or Win7.

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Preferred Solution: Swapping System Drive Letters in Dual Boot Setup

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Answer: Swapping System Drive Letters in Dual Boot Setup

The problem you are faced with is that by default Windows looks for the boot files on your C drive and that is why you've got a problem.

I'm fairly certain there is no other way round your problem, but to boot into Windows 7 and change the system (Windows) drive letter to C.

I'm just intrigued as to why you dislike the default settings so much.

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I set up an XP/Win7 dual boot system using 2 partitions on a single hard disk (XP was pre-installed). All seemed to go smoothly, except for the fact that I couldn't boot from the Win7 DVD for some reason. The process would start loading files from the DVD but would keep stalling just after the progress bar got to 100% and disappeared. After several attempts and trying 2 different DVD drives, I ended up just running the Win7 setup.exe from XP and that got the install completed.

The problem is when I boot into Win7 the system drive is designated as "W:\" not "C:\" ("W" is the letter I assigned to it when creating the partition that would hold Win7). I hate this. Some people mentioned in different how-to's I checked out that their dual boot system automatically designates the system drive as "C:\" regardless of which OS they boot into or partition letters assigned to each OS. How can I get that to work?

Everything else seems to be working properly when in either XP or Win7.
 

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I set up an XP/Win7 dual boot system using 2 partitions on a single hard disk (XP was pre-installed). All seemed to go smoothly, except for the fact that I couldn't boot from the Win7 DVD for some reason. The process would start loading files from the DVD but would keep stalling just after the progress bar got to 100% and disappeared. After several attempts and trying 2 different DVD drives, I ended up just running the Win7 setup.exe from XP and that got the install completed.

The problem is when I boot into Win7 the system drive is designated as "W:\" not "C:\" ("W" is the letter I assigned to it when creating the partition that would hold Win7). I hate this. Some people mentioned in different how-to's I checked out that their dual boot system automatically designates the system drive as "C:\" regardless of which OS they boot into or partition letters assigned to each OS. How can I get that to work?

Everything else seems to be working properly when in either XP or Win7.

Answer:Swapping System Drive Letters in Dual Boot Setup

See MS site: Change, add, or remove a drive letter
Not sure if this still applies, but in early development versions, if you had dual boot XP & 7, booting in XP destroyed 7 System Restore points.

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My 7 year old XP laptop has just received EasyBCD and a new partition with W7.I now realise that the new partition has stolen a letter F:\ which has always been used for a special partition on my external Hard drive, and I want it to stay that way.I believe drive letters are only held in the registry and have no effect outside the O.S. in question, therefore W7 will not be affected by me changing the letter which XP uses to view it.Please confirm it is safe, or explain my error.RegardsAlan.

Answer:Wrong drive letters on Dual Boot System

What is on f: Drive? And what do you mean the partition "stole the letter f:"? What did you do that reassigned drive letters?

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As my subject suggests, i am running a dual boot system comprising of two win xp systems. The second system (F:) is a clone of the first system (C:).

My problem is this: all the programs on the second system still have references to the C: drive (since there is no way to 'mount' systems). And so i need to able to CHANGE the drive letter of the second system to C: when i boot through that system, and vice versa.

To put it in another way... I need to be able to SWAP drives C: and F: dynamically, straight after i have booted through one system, where the active system is always set to drive C:.

Answer: Dynamically changing drive letters after boot on a dual boot system

Yes but i need it to AUTOMATICALLY change drive letters when i boot... so that the filesystem i have booted with is assigned to C: and the other one is swapped to F:

Cheers

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Windows XP runs in a 20 GB partition C:\, with 50% space unused.Before creating an image of C:\ I purge unwanted junk.The latest image is then "validated", but this does not prove bootability.To PROVE bootability, the image must be restored to C:\ and the computer restarted.If the computer failed to restart, the latest image was worthless,AND C:\ is now TRASHED so it is too late to create another image.Therefore I never "test" bootability of an image that probably will not be needed,and when I NEED to restore an image I am a little nervous.For Christmas my Laptop received a much larger hard drive.I now have 20 GB C:\ active, plus 15 GB R:\ primary, plus other logic partitions.Now I can restore the latest image to 15 GB R:\,and a file/folder comparison with C:\ gives a little more confidence.Please advise me of a Boot-CD that can change quickly swap the partitions,e.g.  hide 20 GB C:\ partition, and make 15 GB partition Active as C:\,so I can see for myself that the latest image is (or is not) bootable,AND regardless of bootability, to subsequently hide the 15 GB partition, and make the 20 GB partition active as C:\ with no loss of data.I have Easeus Partition Manager which :-under Windows can change which partitions are active, but cannot hide or alter the letter of the partition which was active, nor the partition which is to become active.It provides a Boot-CD that uses Linux, and avoids confusing me by concealing any knowledge of drive letters - it... Read more

Answer:Please recommend a BootCD to juggle drive letters, or a Dual Boot system.

Image files with a decent image app can and should be verified at the time they are created...What app do you use ? ?

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1. My machine has XP on a single hard drive w/ 3 partitions. In order to try W7 the easiest thing for me to do is to install it on my E: partition. If I boot into W7, do the drive letters change around or do the W7 system files still show up as E:\WINDOWS?

Are there any downsides to this installation that I don't know about? If I got tired of W7 would it be a problem to get rid of the bootloader?

2. My original plan was to buy a second hard drive, install it by itself, and load W7 onto it. Then reconnect the original hard drive and dual boot by changing the boot order in the BIOS. What does this do to the drive letters? I would have one hard drive with 3 partitions and another hard drive with one partition. If I boot W7 I'm guessing that its hard drive would become C: and the other hard drive would become D:, E: and F:. But what happens if I boot XP from the other hard drive? Does it stay C:, D: and E: and the second hard drive becomes F:, or do the letter scramble differently?

Answer:what happens to drive letters when you dual-boot?

When you install Win 7, you will lose the ability to boot to XP. You will have to add the XP partition to Win 7's boot sequence in order to have a choice of either OS at bootup. Easybcd is commonly used for this.

If you install to what is currently E:, then boot to Win 7, Win 7 will be C:.

You will like 7. If you don't, you can then set the XP partition as active, boot straight into XP and then format the 7 partition. 7 gone.

Another hard drive is recommended way to go, but of course, not necessary.

You do not want to keep going into bios to change the boot OS. I mean you can, but no need no matter what the configuration or drives in use.

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I added XP to a system that already had Vista. In the XP installation the Windows partition is F. The Vista partition shows up as C. I tried to change the drive letter of the Vista partition but it said you can't change the drive letter for a system volume.

Is there a way to install XP so that its functions as both the system and boot volumes.
 

Answer:Dual boot drive letters

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Have an issue...
Installed Windows 8 first, then installed Win XP to a second partition on the same disk.
In windows 8, the XP partition is seen as D:
If I boot to XP, XP sees itself as I:
it sees the windows 8 partition as C: and that is what I want, is C: being win 8 and XP being D:
Is there anyway to change the lettering on the XP partition?
Thanks

Answer:Dual boot drive letters

The drive lettering is for you, windows does not look at things by drive letters.

Heres the procedure from Microsoft.com

How to change a drive letterTo change an existing drive letter on a drive, on a partition, or on a volume, follow these steps:
Log on as Administrator or as a member of the Administrators group.Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Performance and Maintenance.Click Administrative Tools, double-click Computer Management, and then click Disk Management in the left pane.Right-click the drive, the partition, the logical drive, or the volume that you want to assign a drive letter to, and then clickChange Drive Letter and Paths.Click Change.Click Assign the following drive letter if it is not already selected, click the drive letter that you want to use, and then click OK.Click Yes when you are prompted to confirm the drive letter change.
The drive letter of the drive, the partition, or the volume that you specified is changed, and the new drive letter appears in the appropriate drive, partition, or volume in the Disk Management tool.

Reference: How to change drive letter assignments in Windows XP

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I recently installed Vista on my laptop along with XP. Within XP my local hard drive (partition) letter is "C" and my Vista partition has the letter "V" . With in Vista my main partition has the drive letter "C" and my XP partition is "D". How can I make each partition drive letter the same for both OS.
 

Answer:Drive letters after dual boot install

If you have other programs installed on the XP partition, reassigning drive letters can make those programs difficult to access.
Vista always wants the C; partition, wherever it sits.
Basically, the easiest way is to reinstall both xp, and Vista, with Vista being the first one you put on, then XP, then drive letters will be correct.
If you have any external hard drives, be sure to connect after installing both systems, so as to keep drive letters in order.
I use HyperOs, and have both, but I renamed any extra partitions so that I know which contains what programs - I have copies in a backup on the C drive, and, at present six partitions over two hard drives, and by keeping the correct order, I can use the second hatd drive to boot from (disconnecting the first hard drive) - so giving me a G partition to boot from on the second hard drive - its easy to live with.
You can use
VistaBootPro, but I have not used it - look up the archives at majorgeeks, as several have used/tried that way.
http://www.majorgeeks.com/VistaBootPRO_d5625.html
 

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1) I currently am running Vista on a laptop on which it is the only OS. I want to install 7 on a second partition for dual boot. However, to keep things tidy, I would like to make Win7 Drive C: (which currently contains Vista). Is there a way to image the hard drive then reload it onto drive D: after I install 7 on C:?

2) I guess my other option is to install 7 on the formatted HD, then create a D: partition to run the Vista recovery disks on... at least that would restore my drivers, etc. But I really wanted to keep my current configuration around for those programs that are slow to catch on to the new OS. (Or do I even have to worry about this?)

3) If all this dual boot stuff is too complicated or if I really don't need to worry about the driver/software compatibility, I might just do away with that idea and clean install it on the C: drive and forget about Vista. (reluctant to do so since I rely on this computer for school). I will be keeping my C: drive image that I took yesterday so taht I can recover to Vista if need be.

Edt: 4) I just had anther thought... If I install Win 7 clean could I then take my Vista hard drive image and make it into a VHD? that would pretty much solve all my troubles I think. Unless I would need to reinstall Vista onto the VHD.

Answer:Questions about Dual Boot and Drive letters

Welcome to Seven Forums.

I originally did the same thing, for the same reason. But never used Vista again after the first time with Win7.
All programs that I ran on Vista work on Win7.
If you don't have the Win7 driver for something the Vista driver will work.

Just keep your Vista backup image, you'll probably never use it but, keep it for safety sake.

Use the Clean install method and use Windows Easy Transfer - Transfer To & From Computers to get all your user settings from Vista, you will still have to install all the programs. It will make the transition easier.

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Hello,

I just partitioned my new 120GB hard drive into 3 separate drives. I installed WinXP pro on 2 of the partitions leaving the third one to just store files.
When I boot into the first WinXP the drive letters look like this:

Drive C: - 80GB (WinXP Pro #1)
Drive D: - 30GB (WinXp Pro #2)
Drive E: - 10GB (Empty)

Now, when I boot into the second WinXp the drives are all mixed up and look like this:

Drive c: 30GB (WinXp Pro #2)
Drive D: 10GB (Empty)
Drive E: 80GB (WinXp Pro #1)

Is there any way I can make all the drives the same no matter which WinXP partition I log into?


Thanks for you help in advance guys.
 

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Have installed XP Pro with Vista dual booting on a newer PC, which has a digital media card reader. It has only 1 hard drive, which is a SATA with 3 primary partitions, the first 2 are formatted NTFS, but the 3rd is not formatted. My Vista installed first is drive C, XP on the 2nd partition was to become drive D, but the XP Pro install assigned it as drive H. So I want to make the XP drive D, the DVD as drive E, and the card reader have the higher drive letters. If I disconnect that card reader, and boot up the computer will Windows then change the drive letters. And if I then re-connect the card reader and re-boot will the new drive letters stay for the XP and the DVD drives ?
 

Answer:Solved: how to change drive letters in a dual boot

After the XP Pro setup completed, and it re-booted to the desktop the card reader drives are assigned these drive letters; D,E,F,G, and the DVD drive is as drive I. There is only 1 optical drive, no floppy or other removable drives, and just that one internal hard drive.
 

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I have Windows 7 64 bit running on C: drive, today I decided to install a second copy onto D: drive to get ready for a fresh start in the near future. Once the installation was complete, I found that all but one of the drive letters had been re-allocated as noted in the attached screen shot of the new installation.
The latest install has allocated drive letter C: to the new installation and the original OS has been allocated to D: and other disks and partitions have had their drive letters altered.
I can still boot into the original OS and that disk manager shows everything as it should be.
Before I do anything that might totally wreck both OS's, how do I get all the drive letters lined up in the new OS to mirror what is in the original?
I have EasyBCD on the original OS.

Thanks in advance

toolman59

Answer:Dual boot installation has moved drive letters

That screen shot makes my head spin. I'm not sure why you installed a second copy to act as a clean copy, rather than just do a clean install, but that could have complicated things.

If it was my system, I'd cut down on all the unnecessary partitions and just use directories. Then, I'd unplug any drives that weren't going to be my primary, and do a clean, fresh install to just that drive. I'm a firm believer in the K.I.S.S. principal.

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I recently bought a 250gb SATA hard drive to replace my old 120gb ATA one. I figured I'd try and clone my existing hard drive instead of starting fresh. So I cloned the partition of my old drive with windows on onto my new drive. That seemed to work okay, so I switched my PC off, disconnected my old drive, and booted it back up again. It got as far as the "Welcome to windows XP" screen and just hung there. Now I realise it's probably because all the file paths are pointing to the C: drive (the old one) instead of the Z: drive (the new one).

Is there a way to change my new drive's letter to C: so it works as my old one did?

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Is it possible to swap drive letters around?

I want to swap the C: drive to be the F: drive, is this possible?

Thanks

Answer:Swapping drive letters

swapping the system drive is harder than swapping other drives, and I don't recommend it.
is there a reason why you want C to be F?

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Hi All

just did a reinstall of my XP install, and I have 2 drives one of which has 2x partitions on...

Since the reinstall - xp has swapped what was my d and e drives over and wont let me change them back as it thinks the E: is the system drive (dispite the fact windows is on C

Its only a small annoyance I know but when your used to looking for things on certain drives its a bit annoying - anyone know a way round this to let me swap the D and E back over (I can change the D easily, just that E drive wont budge).

Cheers
S
 

Answer:swapping drive letters, XP

From the image, it looks like you're trying to change C: to E: while you already have an E:. Change E: to something else, say X: then change C: to E:, then change X: to C:. You have to use three steps, not two.
 

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Here is what I did:

1) Installed Windows 7 Ultimate on a new system with two physical disk drives (c: is an SSD, d: is standard disk)

2) While installing, used SYSPREP to move Users and ProgramData to d:\

3) Pulled the D:\ drive to copy info on it from the system I am replacing

4) MISTAKENLY booted the system and attempted to log in. Got an error (Userprofile was on the missing drive) and shut down. NOTE: Login Picture was missing.

5) Replaced the d: drive.

6) When I boot, I see my profile pic, but I get the error "The user profile services service failed the logon"

7) I had not yet created a second account or enabled the admin account.

8) Opened Repair. In the dos prompt, I see that the boot drive is now "E:\" and the data drive is coming up as c:\ (d:\ = temp and e:\ = DVD for the repair).

9) I tried to restore, but cannot locate a restore point (I know one was created by an install process just before I pulled the drive).

Any ideas? I haven't even created the Admin account in the Repair because I am afraid it will be created with the wrong drive references.

Answer:Dual disk system booting with incorrect drive letters

Take a look at this Tutorial:
SSD - Install and Transfer the Operating System
SSD Tweaks and Optimizations in Windows 7
SSD Alignment
SSD / HDD : Optimize for Windows Reinstallation


Can you post a screen shot of Disk management?
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials...en-forums.html

Screenshot tools.
A Preferred Method of Uploading/Posting Screen Shots
How to Use the Snipping Tool in Vista - Vista Forums
Snipping Tool - Windows 7 features - Microsoft Windows
Use Snipping Tool to capture screen shots
Screenshot with Paint
Screenshot and Upload using MWSnap
fscapture free download

Use Snipping Tool to capture screen shots

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I have a new computer. I want to clone the system to a new SSD. Can I change the drive letter of the SSD to C: after cloning?

My new computer (an ASUS) currently has Windows 8.1. I intend to upgrade to Windows 10 before I do anything more. I will move the old Windows elsewhere before cloning if that is possible.

I have the SSD installed physically but it is not formatted or anything. I intend to use the Samsung Data Migration tool to do the clone. During the clone, the SSD will of course not have the drive letter "C". After the cloning, it must have the drive letter "C", correct? I know we can assign drive letters in Disk Management. I am familiar with partitions and I know that the boot drive/partition is marked as "Active".

Can I re-assign drive letters in Disk Management and delay the change until the next boot? This is just a guess, but it makes sense that the feature might exist. In other words, after the clone, can I change the drive letter ("C") of the current drive to something such as "T" and the SSD drive's letter to "C" and then the change will be effective upon the next boot? The hard drive has a second partition that is empty and is the "D:". It will be confusing for others to have the SSD partition as "C:" and the first partition some other letter and the second partition as "D:" but I understand and I am the only one that will use it. That is a minor detail.

I ... Read more

Answer:Cloning to SSD then swapping drive letters

Hello SamHobbs Welcome to the Ten Forums!

First of all when booted from one OS drive that is the present "C" drive with any other being seen as D. E. F. G, H, etc. depending on how many you have either as far as mutiple primaries on just a pair of drives or when having two or more physical drives to work with. You can change the D if not already used by the optical drive to any other drive letter not already in use.

Once you boot into the second drive's OS the "C" then becomes the D, E, F, G, H, or other next available drive letter in the same fashion. The C is reserved strictly for the drive you are booting from at the present moment. In years past someone might made a registry edit like with XP to see a second OS drive get the "D" drive letter in order to push the optical drive's letter over to another. Or some mishap while Windows was being installed would see that happen requiring a registy edit afterwards to get things sorted out.

As for cloning and not simply seeing a fresh copy of 10 go onto a second OS drive in case of wanting a dual boot of 10 with a previous version, Windows 10 - Dual Boot with Windows 7 or Windows 8 - Windows 10 Forums you will find that will take much longer then simply seeing the first drive have a full system image backup created and stored on a 3rd drive and then restored to the second SSD OS drive.

Did that here on the first day 10 was out and the upgrade over the cloning attempt wasn't anything you would ... Read more

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I have a new computer. I want to clone the system to a new SSD. Can I change the drive letter of the SSD to C: after cloning?

My new computer (an ASUS) currently has Windows 8.1. I intend to upgrade to Windows 10 before I do anything more. I will move the old Windows elsewhere before cloning if that is possible.

I have the SSD installed physically but it is not formatted or anything. I intend to use the Samsung Data Migration tool to do the clone. During the clone, the SSD will of course not have the drive letter "C". After the cloning, it must have the drive letter "C", correct? I know we can assign drive letters in Disk Management. I am familiar with partitions and I know that the boot drive/partition is marked as "Active".

Can I re-assign drive letters in Disk Management and delay the change until the next boot? This is just a guess, but it makes sense that the feature might exist. In other words, after the clone, can I change the drive letter ("C") of the current drive to something such as "T" and the SSD drive's letter to "C" and then the change will be effective upon the next boot? The hard drive has a second partition that is empty and is the "D:". It will be confusing for others to have the SSD partition as "C:" and the first partition some other letter and the second partition as "D:" but I understand and I am the only one that will use it. That is a minor detail.

I ... Read more

Answer:Cloning to SSD then swapping drive letters

Hello SamHobbs Welcome to the Ten Forums!

First of all when booted from one OS drive that is the present "C" drive with any other being seen as D. E. F. G, H, etc. depending on how many you have either as far as mutiple primaries on just a pair of drives or when having two or more physical drives to work with. You can change the D if not already used by the optical drive to any other drive letter not already in use.

Once you boot into the second drive's OS the "C" then becomes the D, E, F, G, H, or other next available drive letter in the same fashion. The C is reserved strictly for the drive you are booting from at the present moment. In years past someone might made a registry edit like with XP to see a second OS drive get the "D" drive letter in order to push the optical drive's letter over to another. Or some mishap while Windows was being installed would see that happen requiring a registy edit afterwards to get things sorted out.

As for cloning and not simply seeing a fresh copy of 10 go onto a second OS drive in case of wanting a dual boot of 10 with a previous version, Windows 10 - Dual Boot with Windows 7 or Windows 8 - Windows 10 Forums you will find that will take much longer then simply seeing the first drive have a full system image backup created and stored on a 3rd drive and then restored to the second SSD OS drive.

Did that here on the first day 10 was out and the upgrade over the cloning attempt wasn't anything you would ... Read more

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I had Windows XP Pro installed on my laptop, then I used Partition Magic to convert some free space into a new partition. I installed Linspire on the new partition, allowing it to configure GRUB for dual-booting. This worked fine, but I decided that I didn't want Linspire anymore, so I formatted that partition from within Windows and rebooted. I used the recovery console on the WinXP cd to run fixboot and fixmbr, then restarted. This worked in my testing of other various Linux distros, but this time I got an error: "NTLDR is missing"

I did some Googling and searching here, but I found nothing that helped with my situation. After some looking around I discovered that the driver letters for the two partitions had been switched somehow. In Windows, before I restarted, the Windows partition was C: and the newly reformatted smaller partition was E:. When I log into the recovery console the Windows install partition is shown as E:/ and the new, empty partition is C:/. Buh?

I've looked everywhere for a way to change the drive letters back to what they should be, but I haven't had any luck. The DISKPART command seemed the most likely solution, but the description in Microsoft's support documentation is apparently for a completely different program, since almost none of the features listed are available from the recovery console.

Does anyone know how I can fix the drive letters? Thanks.
 

Answer:Drive letters wrong after removing Linux dual-boot partition

Never had the need to do it, but have you tried
Control panel->admin tools->computer management->disk management, right-click the partition and select "Change drive letters and path" option?
 

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I have two 1TB drives, each containing 4 partitions, used for backing up 4 computers. These drives are regularly switched between buildings as part of our backup strategy, always having one off-site. I have assigned drive letters M,N,O,P to respective partitions. When I swap the drives, the drive letters get reset and have to be manually reassigned. I have tried several suggested methods of assigning the drive letters, including USBDM, but get no results.

Computers: HP Compaq 8200 Elite - CMT - 1 x Core i5 2500 / 3.3 GHz - RAM 4 GB - SSD 1 x 160 GB - DVD?RW (?R DL) / DVD-RAM - HD Graphics 2000 - Gigabit Ethernet - Windows 7 Professional 64-bit - Intel vPro Technology
Docking Stations: ICY DOCK MB877SK
Hard Drives: SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ 1TB

Answer:Drive letters change when swapping hard drives

Right you are using 2 different drives. Manually Assigning letter to one of them Restrict those letter from being used on the other. When you switch them out the letters have to be manually assigned again. That is how it is suppose to be. Windows Remembers each Drive serial # and or some other drive parameter and sees them as different drives, which they are.

The only way around it is to let Windows assign the letters automatically but that may not work on multiple systems if each of those system have different number of HDDs, Partition on the HDD and or different number of CD/DVD drives install in the systems.

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Hello all,

First post here and seeking some advice please.

The intention is that eventually I (and other family users) will "migrate" to being Win7 users.
The crux of what I want to end up with is Win7 being C:\windows(7)..... etc and XP being D:\Windows(XP).....etc. I want to keep the idea that the OS will be on drive letter C (because other users cannot get their heads around drives other than C


Current arrangement is Disk0 has C: with XP and all my current programs, user documents etc. Disk1 has D: with new install of Win 7 Pro. So far have not copied any existing user files into Win7, but I'm happy with doing that together with re-installing software as I come to needing it.

Disk 0 - C:\ is marked as system disk and has bootmgr which is currently dual boot Win7/XP (actually it is triple boot) because Disk1 also has a 3GB partition of H:\ which has a "skeleton" XP install with just an admin account - put there in case I ever had trouble with C:\ or wanted to backup C:\ with all files closed.

I know (from helpful advice on here) that I cannot change drive letter of the system disk (currently C
but is there a way to get to where I want to be.

In summary,

The Win7 install is new, so could be sacrificed and re-installed if need be - presumably there would be no issue putting the activation code in again ?

I have external storage onto which I can image any of the partitions. Disk0 has already been done.
I use Macrium Refle... Read more

Answer:Advice please on swapping Win7 and XP drive letters (separate disks)

Hello Gromwood, welcome to the Seven Forums.

Your screenshots seem to be taken from XP, showing a (quite) normal Windows XP 7 Seven dual boot system.

Windows always uses the letter C: for system partition, where the operating system is installed. When you boot to Seven you will notice it has become partition C:, and again booting back to XP it will use the letter C:.

As far as I can see your Disk Management shows no issues, nothing to worry.

Kari

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How do I establish a dual boot system? I am running WinXP on both drives.

Thanks,
 

Answer:How is a dual boot system setup?

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my old boot drive was g:\ .. i followed this guide here and changed it to c:\

http://leghumped.com/blog/2007/01/09/change-drive-letter-on-a-boot-device/

upon restarting .. the system doesn't load up .. it gets stuck on the Welcome screen and that's it .. am i screwed?
 

Answer:help me i changed drive letters and now system won't boot

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Is there any way to change drive letters when Windows 7 will not start. (See title)

At present I have 3 Drives, I have tried a few things to boot but to no avail, I think that if I can change
the drive letters , I will find the right drive to boot from. But I can't find a way to change drive letters,
My system is Win 7 Home Prem...

Answer:I Can not boot into system ( I know why, I changed Drive letters)

Drive letters should have no impact on booting, the drive with Windows folder always get C (or it should) automatically.

Please download the bootable Partition Wizard free and boot with it. Bootable Partition Manager | MiniTool Partition Wizard Bootable Edition. Take a photo of the drives, make sure details are there, and don't shake :P post here Screenshots and Files - Upload and Post in Seven Forums

Also;
The tutorial for such issues Troubleshooting Windows 7 Failure to Boot

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my system is Windows 98 1st edition and XP Service Pack 3.I wish to remove windows 98 and incorporate the space into the XP system. I do not want to have to re-install XP and all the associated programs. Windows 98 is on the C: drive and XP on F:D and E are ,respectively, DVD Rom and CD Rom.What is the cleanest way to do this?

Answer:removing one system on a dual boot setup

I assume that booting into XP and going to computer managerment, you can delete the C: partition and then format to NTFS....1) Click Start2) Right Click "My Computer" or with Vista/Win 7 then right click "Computer"3) Click Manage4) Click Disk Management

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I've been working on computers for a long time, and I must admit, I've never cared to learn anything about Linux, and been happy with my Windows home. But as of late, the high school in my town has geared a few of their networking classes towards using Linux. Therefore, as a part time tech at the high school, I need to learn Linux, or at least get a fundamental understanding of it.

As of right now I dont have a secondary rig of my own to devot to Linux, but I have about 30GB of free hard drive space that wont be used for ages on my main rig, so I figure it's time to take the plunge.

This system consists of two HDs, they are not in any RAID setup. One is a 80GB OS/applications HD, the other is a 200GB media HD. I was planning on installing Linux onto the 80GB, because if something goes wrong then I dont have any issues formatting it, but I cant loose the data on the 200GB.

So, what's the easiest way for me to set this up? What programs should I use and where can I find them and guides to using them? What's the most safe way of protecting the data on the 200GB HD?

I will be using Ubuntu if that is of any help.

Looking forward to everyones help.
 

Answer:Easiest Way to Setup Dual Boot System

Ubuntu automatically detects Windows partitions and configures the bootloader for you. The data on the 200 GB should be fine, just pay attention to the Ubuntu installer if you use automatic partitioning and see that it doesn't attempt to partition and format your 200 GB drive. Also, if they are NTFS partitions on the 200 GB, never mount them in writeable mode and actually try to write to them.

Ubuntu has a pretty slick package manager (apt, from Debian) so chances are almost everything you want (unless you have specialty needs) will be in apt repositories. However, what kind of programs are you looking for exactly?
 

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I have had to reinstall both Windows XP and Windows 7 recently, and was pretty angry to discover that both the partition images I had made via Windows native backup facility and my Acronis images, when it came to the time when I needed them, failed me - both declared corrupt or incorrect! Taken me two days to reinstall everything - and I haven't finished yet. Luckily I am on holiday!

So I am trying Macrium Reflect (Free). My question is probably a daft one, but is there any advantage (with Macrium installed on both O/Ss) to making an image of the XP boot partition when I am in Win 7, and the Win 7 partition when I am in XP? Or would it make no difference at all?

I guess I'd only be able to restore the backups when booted into the O/S in which they were created...

Thanks,

Martin

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my old boot drive was g:\ .. i followed this guide here and changed it to c:\

http://leghumped.com/blog/2007/01/09/change-drive-letter-on-a-boot-device/

upon restarting .. the system doesn't load up .. it gets stuck on the Welcome screen and that's it .. am i screwed?
 

Answer:WinXP - help me i changed drive letters and now system won't boot

Did you read the KB article the site linked to? Microsoft strongly advises against doing the procedure unless your boot drive letter changed to something else other than what it installed as. LegHumped screwed you here.

Get your XP CD, boot from it, and repair your install.
 

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i recently reinstalled windows (recently enough i haven't installed any programs yet) and I have a number of hard drives... the difficulty is that for some reason the drive letters it assigned are all wonky. windows is curretly installed on drive J and one of my older drives full of data is drive C. I'd much rather have windows on drive C... but these changes can't be made through disk management. what do i have to do? will i have to reinstall the operating system? how do I specify the drive paths initially... i don't think i was given the option before.
 

Answer:need to change drive letters for system and boot drives.

It sounds like you did not follow the best procedure when you installed the new drive. See the article how to do it properly: http://www.theeldergeek.com/move_harddrive.htm
 

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Hi,

I'd like some advice on installing Vista so that programs and systems files are on one drive and my documents and personal files are on another drive. What's the best way to do it? I've looked around this and other forums and it appears to be something not generally asked. As mentioned I want to separate my program/system files/folders from my personal stuff.

I'm about to reinstall Vista onto my laptop after trying to resolve a problem that went south. My laptop has a single hard drive partioned into three drives (C:, D:, E:). Advice would be appreciated.

Cheers

Answer:Vista setup on dual drive system

hello,
iv'e experimented with this, and the best way IMO is as follows..
say everything is on C: go to start>computer>D: right click (on an empty spot) and mouse over "new" and choose folder ,when a new folder appears name it Pictures (with a capitol P) so now you have a folder on your D: named Pictures...close that window...

go back to start>username>RIGHT click on Pictures and choose properties>location tab, click "move" a destination window opens up..
choose computer (left hand side) then D: there you will see your new Pictures folder (you just created on D:) choose it...then apply, you will be asked if you want to move all (or something like that) click YES, (this may take a few minutes depending on the size of your folder..

then just follow the same steps to move any/all you personal folders your wish..

just be sure to name the folders on D: the exact same as C: (capitol 1st letter)

the great part is that your documents,music,pictures still show in your start menu, and the path takes you right to wherever you moved them to.

there may be an easier way but I don't know it..

g day mate (always wanted to use that) ..lol

ps substitute drive letters that you want!
this is after you are done installing windows of course.

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I have managed to get myself into a situation where the "System Reserved" partition is on a different physical drive from my current C drive. This is, I presume, as a result of creating a dual boot system without fully understanding the consequences.

I need to correct this because I intend to wipe out the older drive (which contains the System Reserved partition which, I guess, is where the boot manager is located.)

Since I'm somewhat confused about the difference between a "system reserved" partition and a bootmgr and which is required where, I thought the easiest way to describe my problem is to describe the steps that got me here with screen grabs where appropriate.


At the start of this process I had a plain vanilla 32 bit install of Windows 7. The system resided on an OCZ 60 GB SSD, that contained both a 100 MB "System Reserved" partition and a second 55 GB partition that represented the C Drive as shown below.



When I periodically created a system image (using "Create a system image" from the Backup and Restore Control Panel) it would require me to include both the "system reserved" partition and the C partition, which was fine and what I expected.

A few weeks ago I decided that I wanted to move to the 64 bit version of Windows 7 and decided upon installing it on a new second SSD (a Samsung 830) using a dual boot setup to go back and forth between the two OS's during the time required to get all my a... Read more

Answer:My Dual Boot setup has the boot mgr on the wrong drive

Hi hwilker, welcome to SF

I think your half way there, all you need to understand is the boot manager resides at present in sys reserved partition so any backup will require the OS (whichever one your backing up) + boot manager & that can be on either drive.

You can use easyBCD to move boot manager and if you want delete sys reserve partition altogether BUT remember that windows keeps some recovery help in there also so make sure you have win install/recovery disks incase needed and always where possible take backups if your not sure

Hope this helps

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I have two hard drives, both of them with Win 2000 Pro. The First has been the master in machine one from the start. The second HDD has been in machine twoand that machine has crashed so bad that it is not worth the time, energy or money to fix it. This second HDD has important data on it that is only accessable through older programs that are only on this drive. (It is a church membership data base program and a church financial record program) I have the added problem that no one in the office has a clue where the install disk are for these programs and they are not where they are suppose to be (this was before my time).
I would like to place the second HDD in the first machine and set up a dual boot so the user can choose which drive to operate from. There is the added problem that the computers only have a restore disk that came from Dell and not a full Win 2000 Pro CD.

Can anyone help me with setting up the dual boot?
 

Answer:Need Help with Dual Boot Drive Setup 2000 Pro

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Answer:extra hard drive/dual boot setup

I am thinkink of adding another hard drive to my comp so I can use 2 op systems (Win2Kpro/XPpro)(I can run them both on single drive, but when I install XP service pack 1 it wipes the boot files for Win2k) and was wondering how the boot setup would work with this? would windows sort it out or would I have to use bootmagic/partition magic or something? Also if I get a 7200 drive will my old 40gb drive slow it down? (how do I check speed of old drive?)

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I upgraded to Win 7 (Home Premium) from XP by adding a new physical drive, not by inserting a new partition into the original boot drive. As a result, files essential to the booting of Win 7 are stuck on the XP drive. The XP drive cannot be removed or reformated because doing so would make it impossible to boot Win 7 from its drive, at least as is.

I have already added a great number of files to the Win 7 drive, and there is no space left on the XP drive to reinstall Win 7 there either. If possible, I need a solution that will make the Win 7 drive bootable so I can remove the XP drive completely, or reformat it.

As currently configured, XP is on drive C:, Win 7 was added to drive E:, and the system is currently run as a dual boot. Attempting to boot without the XP drive present will yield a "NTLDR is missing" error very early in the boot process.

I have already tried the following:
(1) I moved the hidden Windows Boot Manager files (bootmgr as well as the associated Boot folder) from the XP drive root to the Win 7 drive root.
(2) After physically removing the XP drive, I rebooted to the Win 7 installation DVD, and used the "Repair Your Computer" option to pull up the "Recovery Tools". Then, using the command prompt utility, ...
(3) I attempted to write a new boot sector to the Windows 7 disk using the command: Bootrec /fixboot, - that yields an error though. The Bootrec /fixmbr claimed success, but ultimately did not make Win 7 drive bootable. ... Read more

Answer:How do I remove XP from a dual-boot on dual-drive system, leaving the Win 7?

I found a solution. It's convoluted but it works. I will present it here in detail in case anyone else runs into this problem. I also found a Microsoft support article related to it, although it's discussing this problem for an older version of Windows:

Changing Active Partition Can Make Your System Unbootable

The article points out the boot-up error symptomatic of having multiple active partitions ahead of the actual partition with the OS: "NTLDR is missing". That is exactly what I experienced. Since most people use drive C: to boot from, they may never see be aware of this idiosyncratic problem, as active partitions after the first won't cause the problem. Microsoft blames an Intel's design for this oversight.

I first disconnected all other hard drives except my chosen boot drive, - this allowed Win 7 to boot properly, if only from that one drive. Here's the way in which I finally was able to reconnect all the drives and boot from my Win 7 drive:

(1) Once Win 7 was able to boot from the single drive remaining, I deleted the unnecessary boot menu left over from the dual boot by running the command prompt utility in the administrator mode, (right-click on command prompt program icon, select Run as administrator), and used the following command to delete the menu: BCDEdit /delete {ntldr} /f

(2) I then reconnected all the drives I previously removed. Consistent with what I'd expect if the Microsoft article was true, Windows 7 no lon... Read more

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Relevance 71.34%

(Win98se, Athlon 1.4.)
Hi, I have two mobile racks with my primary C: in one and I put my backup D: in the second to make a Ghost Clone for backup weekly.
To test the clone I have to pull both hard drives out of their racks and switch master slave jumpers. (As compared to just switching the two mobile racks which I think I could do with cable select.)
I am using an 80 pin, primary cable with a red edge on it, there are no markings but one of the cable to hard drive connectors is white and the other is black.
Question 1: Will this cable work with Cable Select and how do I use the Cable Select setting so I won’t have to switch jumpers?
Question 2: Is it possible to open and slide those connectors along the cable if they won’t reach one of the mobile racks or will I have to buy another cable?
Thanks in Advance, Meta
 

Answer:How To Setup Cable Select For Dual Mobile Hard Drive System

Meta, if i understand your question right you need to make both drives cable select ? . If that is the case will need to either look on the drives and should see some kind of schematics which should tell you how to move the jumpers to make it cable select.
If there is no drawing on the hdd cover, get to the site of the manufacturer and should see under Support how to make a hdd cable selected enabled.
As for your second question i don't quite get it... Which connectors are you refering to? The ones in the mobil rack or on the hdd itself..
 

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I guys, I'm new here...wassup?

I have a question for you. I followed a thread posted in this forum where chocobogo_rct needed to change his boot.ini file in order to havea dual boot screen apon startup.

I have a similar problem.
I have a dual boot system set up at the moment with Windows 98 on the primary drive and XP pro on the slave.

The boot.ini file on the primary HD looks like this:
[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect /NoExecute=OptIn
C:\="Microsoft Windows"

There is no boot.ini file in the root directory of the slave HD.

So what I want to do is this:
I want to make the slave (XP) HD the master, but when I plug it in as master the the computer cannot boot from that drive (no boot records).

I think I need to change the boot records so that the slave hard drive is the master and the master is the slave. How do I do this? Do I delete the boot.ini file on the existing master (Win98), and create a new one on the existing slave (XP), then physicall swap the two?
If yes, what do I change the boot.ini file to?
 

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Hi guys
in my desktop I have two hard disks ( disk 0 and disk 1 ) . Disk 1 is a clone of disk 0 created by Macrium Reflect
Disk 0 : ( C: ) windows 10 pro , upgrade from windows 7 , ( E: ) windows 8.1 pro , ( G: ) Storage partition
Disk 1 : clone of disk 0
problem description : I see in msconfig / boot a wrong listing
windows 10 ( C:\WINDOWS) : Current OS ; Default OS
windows 8.1 pro ( H:\WINDOWS ) instead of ( E:\WINDOWS )
nevertheless the dual booting works fine as well as the shift between the disks via BIOS.
The question is , could I fix the situation using the EasyBCD of Neosmart Technologies to edit the bootloader ?
I see can change drive letter H: to E: and save the change , am I right or wrong ?
or any other way
any help appreciated , thanks .

Answer:wrong drive letter in msconfig / boot in dual boot system

from Admin command, type: bcdboot E:\Windows
From msconfig, delete the entry pointing to H:

3 more replies
Relevance 68.06%

Hi guys
in my desktop I have two hard disks ( disk 0 and disk 1 ) . Disk 1 is a clone of disk 0 created by Macrium Reflect
Disk 0 : ( C: ) windows 10 pro , upgrade from windows 7 , ( E: ) windows 8.1 pro , ( G: ) Storage partition
Disk 1 : clone of disk 0
problem description : I see in msconfig / boot a wrong listing
windows 10 ( C:\WINDOWS) : Current OS ; Default OS
windows 8.1 pro ( H:\WINDOWS ) instead of ( E:\WINDOWS )
nevertheless the dual booting works fine as well as the shift between the disks via BIOS.
The question is , could I fix the situation using the EasyBCD of Neosmart Technologies to edit the bootloader ?
I see can change drive letter H: to E: and save the change , am I right or wrong ?
or any other way
any help appreciated , thanks .

Answer:wrong drive letter in msconfig / boot in dual boot system

from Admin command, type: bcdboot E:\Windows
From msconfig, delete the entry pointing to H:

1 more replies
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I have a dual boot system (2 hard drives) booting Suse and XP and boot up through Suse's built in boot manager which gives me the option of booting to Windows or Linux.

But since I barely ever use Linux I want to delete it off the 2nd drive so I can use it for a storage drive, so I'm wondering how to replace the Windows Master Boot Record so I can just boot into my XP drive. I'm scared that once I delete/reformat the contents of the 2nd hard drive (I'll probably use Partition Magic to do this through my XP drive) that I won't be able to boot XP up anymore. So before I do anything I want to just be able to boot into XP and bypass the linux drive before I delete it to make sure everything is ok.

Can anyone help me out with this?

Thanks.
 

Answer:Want to replace Master Boot Record on dual boot system & delete Linux drive

Yeah, if you toast linux then it won't boot up. I had that problem when I used Fedora and got rid of it. Boot from your XP disk and go to the repair console. You can use commands in there to make a new mbr. I can remember the exact command. I think you can type help and that will give you a list of available commands. I think it is "fixboot" or "fixmbr" but I can't remember the exact command.
 

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I have 2 Hard drives currently
(1) XP Home installed
(2) Storage

I am trying to install XP Pro on the second hard drive, I have information on there I dont want to loose so I created a second partition. When windows setup runs for XP Pro the drive letter assignments are different from the XP home install on the other HD. This is fine by me except that I want XP Pro to be on the C: drive. I am having trouble convincing xp setup to no assign C to the storage partition of my second hard drive. I have created partitions before and after it on the HD to try to shuffle it up but nothing seems to work. I cant create a C: using my current home install because that is already taken and XP pro just ignores those assignments anyway.

Any help is appreciated. (also any reccomendations for partition size for alternate XP installs, the second drive is 1.5TB so I made a 50G partition even though I know it wont need that much)

Answer:Windows Drive Letters During Setup

After some more struggling with my limited knowledge and many loadings of that nasty blue xp setup screen I finally found where the storage partition was set to active, I set the install partition to active and voila! It is recognized as C.

I am glad however that my searches have brought me to these forums as they seem to be a wealth of knowledge.

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Help

I can't boot into my xp drive from my Dual boot system. Primary and default boot is Win7 Secondary boot is WinXP. Both OS's are on separate drives. When I try to boot into the XP drive My error msg says:

"Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt: <Windows root>\system32\hal.dll. Please re-install a copy of the above file."

So far to this this I have reinstalled a Norton Ghost image of Windows 7. No Joy. I also tried to fix the boot sector from Windows 7 by using the repair function when installing the operating system. No Joy.

Evidently there are some other commands could use from the command prompt? Would they help. I have been using Windows since 1998 but I never learned the boot sector very well and am lost when trying to fix it.
 

Answer:Cannot boot into XP drive in Win7/XP Dual Boot System.

Install EasyBCD free version in Windows 7 and use it to add XP to the boot menu.

https://neosmart.net/Download/Register/1
 

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Relevance 66.42%

Ive read the Instructions on how to setup XP to dual-boot with Vista...
However, im concerned (and someone mentioned it happened to them in the thread)
that when XP SETUP is finished with the TX part of setup and reboots PC to go into the
rest of setup (GUI XP SETUP)) it wont continue....?
is this right>? ive read elsewhere that if the partitions for XP are created in Vista that it wont boot into the rest of setup....

I could make the partition during XP setup if this will help?

thanks
 

Answer:Vista/XP Dual Boot - Will XP setup continue into GUI setup after reboot of 1st part.?

When I did my dual boot [using win2k / vista] I used an existing partition that was created by vista. No problem at all. It is a little more difficult than say installing win2k after xp however as long as you follow the instructions there are no problems.

As always make an image of your system before you start. This way if something does go wrong, it is a simple matter to restore the image and be back where you started from.
 

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Hello all, I have a HP p6516f running Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit. What I am trying to accomplish is to run a program that I was running on my 32 bit XP machine. This program will not run on a 64 bit OS. So what I am trying to do is dual boot XP Pro 32 bit. I have the dual boot down, that is not the problem. The problem is that I have files that I have saved from this program that I want to run on this new machine. The old files that I want to patch to the new installation of XP on the new machine are rooted to the C:\Program Files.

Here is where the problem lies. Windows 7 by default is installed to the C drive. When I install XP on a new partition, it takes out the MBR of Windows 7. To fix this I used EASYBCD to rewrite the MBR to boot both Windows 7 64 bit and Windows XP Pro 32bit. When I do this the drive letters change in XP. Now the partition that contains my active boot files are now given the drive letter C, Windows 7 OS partition gets the drive letter H, and XP OS partition gets the drive letter K.

I need to install the program that I want to run on the C drive for the patch files to work. It must be installed on C:\Program Files for all to work correctly. How can I install this program and have the install path have the C:\Program Files path. Like I said, the C drive has the active boot files and is only 100 MB. In Windows 7, Disk managment shows Windows 7 as Drive C.

I have considered trying Virtual Box to pull this off but would rather boot to XP at s... Read more

Answer:Dual Booting and Drive Letters

So, if i am following, you want Windows 7 FROM XP, to appear as C:? Correct?

The problem is that the drive letters for each OS are separate, and it will be less of a "fuss" if each OS is installed in its own "C: drive". The only thing that i could suggest is that you install the program into XP and then copy the files from Win. 7 to XP. (unless you want to change the drive letter of XP to something other than "C:", but CAN create problems)

I hope i understood you right.....

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I have a dual-boot setup. Volume C runs Vista Home Premium. Volume F runs Vista Ultimate. (Vol. D is a recovery volume.) I would like to blow away C: and boot only from F. Would the following be a possible/advisable solution?

1. Boot from F.
2. Delete C.
3. Rename F "C".
4. Expand F (the new "C") to include the old C.

Thanks!

Answer:Can I delete the C drive from a dual boot system?

i dont think its possible without screwing up all your installed programs.

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I hope I don't get in trouble for this. I "moved" this to hardware.Topic 38996

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I just got my xp/vista dualboot machine back up. I want to put in a second hd.
will both vista and xp both be able to properly use the drive? It woudnt be locked to vista or xp?
I will be using it only for data storage or a working folder for video conversion. No games or program installs.
Thanks! for any advice

E1200 celeron Dual core
Gigabyte GA 945 GCM -s2c
2gig DDR2
WD 320 XP/Vista Dual boot SATA 2 HD
Athena 400 watt MATX psu
8400GS
samsung 16 x PATA DVD burner
 

Answer:second hard drive in dual boot system

Format it to NTFS and it should automatically show up on both OS installations
 

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Relevance 66.01%

The simplest way to put my problem is that in DOS, I could solve it with "sys C:\" then FDisk to make sure the drive I want is Boot, Active and System.

Some years ago, I set up a 1 TB SATA drive to dual boot XP Pro 32 bit and 64 bit. Lots of things changed since then but drives C:, D: and E: are still there. I bought Win7 Pro the day M$ made it available, installed it on a new 640 gig SATA drive and somehow set up dual boot with 'older OS' (XP Pro 64, no longer runs), Win 7 Pro RC and the full retail Win 7 Pro 64. Right, the only functioning OS in the boot menu is Win 7 Pro 64 retail. I discovered yesterday morning that the new 640 gig Win 7 drive is NOT the system drive. The old 1 TB drive did not spin up and the boot menu returned the error "ntldr not found, press CTRL+ALT+DELETE to reboot." DUH.

Back in DOS days gaming, I had to know how to do all this stuff manually. You sure didn't get any help from Windows! But I haven't had to even install an OS often enough to remember much about the process in years.

So, is there a simple, easy way to make my Win 7 installation drive the System drive? Then can I do away with the multi boot menu and just boot straight into Win 7 Pro like I want to?

Thanks all!

Answer:Two HDD's, Dual boot, Wrong Drive is SYSTEM

We need to see a picture of your maximized Disk Mgmt drive map with listings - using the Snipping Tool in Start Menu - to give you the exact steps. Screen Shots

Tell us what is on each partition, which you want to keep and elminate, and whether you want to recover the disk space for those deleted and to where.

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Would like to try out win 8, before committing.



Can I use one of these unassigned partitions, a=100Mb, b=1GB? Obviously I would have to increase them in size and assign drive letter. Was thinking 40960MB for trial Win 8 install

What is in these spaces?

Answer:My Win 7 Disk has 4 partitions, (2Drive letters) want to dual boot

only try..not permanent?

100MB=system reserved. It's the boot partition with bootmgr and bootmenu
48GB=RECOVERY. Used to restore to factory settings in case you have severe problems. I don't understand why it has so much free space!
1GB: Special for recovery as well. Maybe drivers for recovery.

You want to keep 1GB and 48GB partition? They are useless most of the time! If you hardrive becomes faulty that isn't working as well. And if it is working... you go back to factory settings... AND YOU LOSE EVERY PROGRAM, DATA AND ALL SETTINGS!! You better backup to external disk. Do you have one?

You can get rid of 100MB partition if you want. I can give you instructions how to move it to BOOT (C)

At least one of those partitions must be deleted. Maximum number of partitions is 4!
Also what's possible: 3 primary partitions and 1 extended. In extended parition can be a lot of logical partitions.

Tell me what you want

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Hi all

Please bear with me I'm new at this and a little unsure as to exactly what I'm doing.

A few months ago I was having trouble with an incredibly slow system running Vista 32 bit. I run some RAM hungry programs so decided I'd try a Win 7 64 bit system, and if it was stable I would then look to increase my RAM beyond 3GB (Apparently my motherboard will take 8GB of RAM)

A screen shot of my basic system info is here...
I obviously now want to stay with Win 7 64bit and format the Vista drive for the storage space but have no idea how to make my Win 7 drive the system drive and then format the old Vista drive.

I hope I've given enough info, and my request makes sense.

I'd be really grateful of a fairly straight forward "how to". I'm reasonably savvy and can follow instruction but certainly no expert.

Many thanks in advance

Chris

Answer:Cant format old system drive after dual boot install

Mark the Windows 7 HD Drive ACTIVE
Partition - Mark as Active
Than
Physically disconnect the old HD.
Make the Windows 7 HD, disk0 & first HD boot in BIOS.Also connected to the first Sata port on the MOBO.


Startup Repair
Note: You may need to do startup repair 3 to 4 times.
Startup Repair - Run 3 Separate Times



When Windows is booting OK, Reconnect the other two HD, as Disk1.




Mark the Windows Vista HD Drive INACTIVE
Partition - Mark as Inactive

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I have a computer with a dual boot system. I have Win ME on the C: drive and XP on the D: drive. I want to remove the smaller of the drives containing Win ME and just run Win XP from the larger D: drive (which would obviously become the C: drive) but when I remove the smaller drive and reboot I get an error saying NTLDR is missing. I searched on another computer running Win XP and it is in the folder I386 so I copied the whole of this folder to D: and removed the small C: drive again but still get the same error. How can I get the drive with XP on it to be the sole drive and get windows to load without errors??

Answer:Remove hard drive from dual boot system

In your dual boot, all the boot files are on C. D has no boot files. If you don't mind the drive letter changes, try the following.Your hdd where XP is installed needs 3 files: ntldr, ntdetect.com and boot.iniNtldr and ntdetect.com are in the i386 folder on the XP CD. They are also on the ME partition.Reinsert your ME hdd and boot into XP.Copy the 2 files from the CD or from C drive to the current D drive (so that they become d:\ntldr, d:\ntdetectcom) - copy, not move the files.The boot.ini file, you can either use XP's Recovery Console (bootcfg command) or do it manually using Notepad.First have a look at the existing c:\boot.ini file. click Start, Run, type c:\boot.ini and press Enter. Just have a look at the format of the text file. Don't change this file. Close this file.In Notepad, create a new file by typing:[boot loader]timeout=30default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS[operating systems]multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition" /fastdetectSave it as d:\boot.ini (DO NOT overwrite c:\boot.ini).Click Start, Run, type diskmgmt.msc and press Enter.Right click your XP partition and see if there is an option to mark partition as active. If so, select it. I suspect it's greyed out, that's OK.Turn off computer. Disconnect ME hdd. Set XP hdd as master. Restart to see if it will load XP.If it doesn't load XP, post back error message.But in the meantime, you can insert XP CD and restart from CD. Press R for Recovery Console, press ... Read more

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I am unexperinte with partitions and boots on Windows & (and other systems too). I had installed Windows 7 x64 ultimate on my computer in a 150GB hard drive.
I bought a new 1TB HD and created 3 partitions (two with 250 GB and another with 500 GB). I copied my system from 150GB drive to the first 250GB partition on my new HD and had a dual boot system installed (my old 150 GB system and my old system copy on my new 250 GB partition). I following reinstalled the Windows 7 x64 system in my second 250GB in order to reinstall all my programs again to clean up all dirt stuff I had installed since I installed Windows 7 the first time.
Now I had 3 boots working fine (my old system, my copy, and my new system).
I in sequence formatted my old system in the 150 GB and did a new boot and what a surprise! The system did not boot any more.
Surprised and desesperated I reinstalled the Windows 7 again on my 150Gb drive and everything started normally again, but I had 3 boots (my copy, my new system where I was installing my programs again and the system in my 150Gb HD).
I looked now on my Disk Management and get the following:
Disk 1 Drive E: 250,60GB NTFS Healthy (Active, Primary Partition (my copy)
Disk 1 Drive C: 251,23 GB NTFS Healthy (Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition (the system where I am installing my programs again)
Disk 2 Drive F: 149,05 GB NTFS Healthy (System, Active, Primary Partition)
I realize that when I did a format in my 150GB partition it... Read more

Answer:How to format a drive with Windows 7 Dual Boot system?

Reading your post, all I see is one big mess, & not sure what stage you are at.
From what i can see, your HD Drive layout may be like the screenshot below.



Take a look at this base tutorial:
Help me get windows 7 to boot (again)

But you may like to start afresh with a clean install, with the 1TB HD Drive as Disk0 & the other HD Drive physically disconnect.

You also say you are dual booting, Windows 7 & OS unknown.

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I have a new machine with 64 bit windows 7 and is running just fine. Another machine is running windows xp pro 32 bit and I want to take it's C: drive with xp running and stick it into my new machine and use it for a dual boot drive without messing up the register.
I have several apps running on that machine that would like to keep running just as they are but under the cover of the new machine.

Both machines are sata drives. I can put the old C: drive into the bay on the new box but obviously can't run the XP apps that I want to run.

I also do not want to mess up my nice new windows 7 OS. Are any of the tutorials addressing this where the XP OS is already installed?

Answer:want to dual boot with a xp system hard drive from another machine

Welcome!

You probably will have issues with drivers, moving a hard drive from one machine to another. I have to recommend a clean install of XP.

Check out this tutorial: Dual Boot Installation with Windows 7 and XP

You may try adding the XP boot entry into 7's boot loader using EasyBCD 2.0: Download EasyBCD 2.0.2 - NeoSmart Technologies

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Hi there,
Im sure many of you must know the answer to my situation.

I have 2 Hard drives : C: and E:

C: 120gb XP PRO ( HOME USAGE )

E: 80gb XP PRO LEOPARD ( BUSINESS USAGE )

.... Windows have automatically created a dual boot screen for me to go into either OP.

But as E: drive is newly installed, everytime i installed some selected software, it automatically installs in C: Drive. But there are some small softwares where i can manually change the installation Destination folder.

My E: Drive has windows sp2, and i have sp3 cd update from windows. WHen i install it, it automatically installs it on my current C: Drive.

===================================

???? Is there anyway, when i do login to a selected operating system, that i become automatically C: ?????


eg. if from dual boot i select "XP Leopard" whats actually installed on E: but when i do login, and go to my computer. I automatically become C: drive and make the orignal C: to E: like switching. So i stay main installation drive.

Im really comfused and dont know what to do, or use. Could someone experienced in this area help me out.
 

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I installed a new second hard drive on my system, so that I could set up the second hard drive to my likeings before making it the primary drive. Now that I have it loaded properly, will I be able to just unplug the primary drive, put the jumper on the second drive to the primary position and be ok??

Both of the drives have Win XP Home... but I noticed that when I boot to the second hard drive, it takes allot longer to boot up than the primary drive does. So I wasn't sure if some of the actual boot records are still on the primary drive, and that is why it takes longer for the second drive to boot up.

My final intentions are for the new second drive to be my primary drive, and then maybe use the old primary drive as a data drive.

Thanks for any help you can give me.

Wayne
 

Answer:Dual Boot system back to single drive.

Can anyone advise me on this?

Thanks for any help you can give me.

Wayne
 

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I just bought an ASUS S400CA, with a 500GB 5400rpm drive and a 24GB SSD for booting.

It appears to me that the HDD is the boot drive, so the 24GB on-board SSD should not be an issue. Correct me if I am wrong.

The HDD system was partitioned approximately like this...

1) 100MB (Windows use)
2) 300MB (Windows use)
3) 128MB (hidden, windows)
4) 128GB (C: Drive, system volume)
5) 250GB (D: Drive, empty)
6) 20GB (Recovery)
I have a spare 128GB SSD, and so I did the following:

1) Created a recovery thumb drive for the laptop. Windows gave me the option to delete the last, 20GB portion, and I did.
2) Deleted the D: partition
3) Shrank the C: partittion to approx 80GB using Disk Management

I then used linux gdisk to copy the partition table of the HDD to the SSD, then used clonezilla to duplicate the 4 remaining partitions.

The laptop did not even recognize the drive for booting. Not that it could not find the boot partittion, the BIOS literally did not detect the drive. Which is STRANGE, because it obviously detected the drive when I loaded linux from a USB volume and wrote to it.

I am now running the dd tool to clone the drive, and I'll see how that works. But am I missing something? Do I have to do something special to accomplish this?

Thanks!

Answer:Swapping out the HDD on a system with an SSD fast-boot

Welcome to EightForums.

You can use the Windows system image.

System Image - Create in Windows 8

Recovery Drive - Create with USB Flash Drive in Windows 8

System Repair Disc - Create in Windows 8
Than restore to the SSD.
or
Paragon 12.
PARAGON Software Group - partition manager, drive backup, hard disk partitioning

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I?d like to set my Windows 8.1 computer for dual boot.I have 2 drives installed (Windows 8.1 & Vista Home), and I?d like to have the option of choosing which OS to boot with.Is that possible?Much thanks!Windows 8.1Intel® Core? i5-440CPU @ 3.10 GHz12gb RAM64-bit Operating System, x64-based processorIntel® 8 Series/C220 Chipset Family SATA AHCI ControllerSeagate ST2000DM001-1CH164 (Win8.1)Seagate ST3750528AS (Vista Home)

Answer:How to setup dual boot with dual hard-drives?

Your ONLY option is via the bios and setting which drive boots.Otherwise you have to reinstall the 2nd drives OS while the first drive is booting. Then you can do a multiboot.Answers are only as good as the information you provide.How to properly post a question: Sorry no tech support via PM's

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Hi, I hope someone out there can give me some advice on what I need to do.

I've just bought a new computer for making music on, this is an upgrade from my old XP system. The computer comes with (when it arrives) windows Vista, I have also bought another copy of XP.

What I would like to do is create a dual boot system with XP and Vista but after looking into this I came across a problem. I have a second hard drive with all my music files on which is an E: drive. After reading an installation guide for a dual boot system I read that the second OS installation automatically installs the OS as E:.

My problem is that my 200GB E drive is full with music project files that need to run from the E drive because they contain audio files, changing the drive letter would cause each project to be unable to locate it's audio files.

What I need to know is if there is a way I can install the two OSs on one hard drive and keep my other hard drive as E:.

I've heard about virtual PC but I'm not sure if using this it would be possible doing it this way either...

If anyone's got any advice it'd help me out loads

Thanks

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Here's the situation. I have a 17" Sager laptop with two hard drives set up with dual boot. The first drive is the OEM drive that came in the laptop and Win7. After I installed my work software, and made sure the machine was stable, I used the computer in this configuration for a few months. I then decided to set up dual boot using a Crucial SSD drive with Win7 in the vacant 2nd hard drive bay. This allowed me to work from the old drive while I organized the SSD with my work software. (AutoCad, Rhino, etc) and made sure it was stable. After the SSD setup, it became my primary drive, and I never used the OEM drive again.

Now, with Win 10 about to be released, I was thinking about removing the idle l OEM drive and adding a new SSD and Win 10. (This would let me keep working from the Win7 SSD) However, If I remember correctly, the dual boot information (Boot Manager?) is on the original drive. Wouldn't removing that drive also disable the current Win 7 SSD?

It has been about 3 years since I dug into a computer and much has changed. I'm hoping someone here can give me info, suggestions, or even a step by step procedure to get this right.

thanks in advance.

Answer:Remove original drive in dual boot system and replace Win 10 SSD? How?

Please post back a screenshot of Disk Management - Post a Screen Capture Image
with all drives connected.

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Relevance 64.37%

I`m trying to setup a dual boot. The primary drive has Win98SE. In error, Win2KPro as a new fresh install ended up setup on the primary drive. What is the proper proceedure to remove all traces of W2000 Pro on the pri drive and reinstall on the secondary drive. The second drive (as per Maxtor Support) previously had the Write Dick Pack option (low-level format) using the PowerMax utility. Then using MaxBlast to reformat and partition the 2nd drive. Could you outline the proper proceedures. I class my computor skills as beginner. Although I have installed and max`ed out my PC133 memory. Added a graphics card upgrade, and a 2nd drive. Please make the sun shine again? Thanks, Bruce. PS: I could run a Diag Utility AIDA32, if you need more info. tnx!
 

Answer:Win2KPro installed wrong drive, dual boot system.

Since you are dual booting, the best way to Uninstall Windows 2000 is explained in this guide. http://www.budja.com/w2k/uninstall_w2k.html

However, on the other hand, if you just installed Windows 98 with nothing to lose.. you might as well wipe the drive clean using a format and resetup everything.
 

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hello everyone-

Ive got kind of a weird problem:

I recently received my fathers old computer that has some data on it that i may need to access in the future, it also has programs on it that i don't have install disks for anymore.
Because the hard drive is somewhat temperamental and i don't want to keep an old desk top laying around, i would like to transfer everything to a new hard drive (ie i could boot from the new drive had have access to all the old software). Then i am going to mount it in my current desktop and hook it up when i need to access it.

So the question is: can i do this? and if i can how would i go about it.
 

Answer:Swapping Boot Drive

This is probably more hassle than its worth.

The files and documents I would suggest putting on an external drive/flash drive.

The software is installed on your father's operating system. Your father's operating system is configured to work with his machine (drivers etc). Probability is that his operating system will not work on your PC without a reinstall (in which case you could lose the software you want to save).

What 'old' software would you need to keep? Can you not get new software that does the same?
 

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my beloved a64 box has stood by me for 3 years, but now i have to use serious software for school (video editing, flash, photoshop, autodesk) so i need a stronger machine... i still need to figure out the specs ill need but i have one main question at this point, KVM switches.

right now (in the a64) i have a radeon 9800 256 pushing 2 monitors at 1280*1024 and a kvm switch that allows one monitor, the keyboard and mouse to click to my linux box when i hit scroll lock twice fast. is there a such switch that could switch BOTH monitors and keyboard and mouse AND sound between my a64 box and future dual core intel? (or whatever you guys recomend lol)
 

Answer:dual system- dual monitor setup

You could get a better AMD processor if it is a socket 939 and then there would be no need for a new motherboard, a Skt 939 Athlon X2 would be good, if you dont wanna upgrade ur mobo.
 

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Hello there

I purchased a Crucial MX300 525gb SSD to upgrade my laptop storage, that has an Intel Opal SSD 180gb on it. I need more space

My idea was to clone the information from one SSD (intel is now inside the laptop) to the bigger SSD (using an USB-SATA cable and SSD adapter). So I just swap it.

Information is supposed to be cloned succesfully, but System, Boot and Active things are still attached to the old drive. I dont know what to do to transfer them to the new SSD.

Do I need to change the drive letter assignment ? or there's a way to copy paste those files ?

any workaround in cmd ? and if theres is some, I may need to know the steps.

Psd: Im using Minitool partition Wizard 10.2.1, and I dont have a CD drive. Im using this https://www.amazon.com/AUKEY-Enclosu...+ssd+enclosure

Thanks a lot in advance.

Answer:Swapping Smaller SSD with Bigger SSD - Cloning whole system and boot.

Why can't you clone the entire drive ?

Personally I`d use an image. Use Macrium Reflect, not Partition Wizard.

Backup and Restore with Macrium Reflect Backup Restore Tutorials

Bootmgr - Move to C:\ with EasyBCD - Windows 7 Help Forums

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I just picked up a computer today. I wanted to put a bigger hard drive in it to replace the small 20 gig drive for storage. This is not the boot disk, it's the d: drive.
With the old drive hooked up it will boot up fine. With the new drive, it gives me the error "Boot Failure: System Halted"
I don't know if it would help, but I thought about running a windows repair - but then realized I don't have the admin password. It's running XP Home.
Thanks
 

Answer:Solved: can't boot after swapping d: drive - Win XP

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I've read all the bitlocker information and posts but think I've missed something. I have a Dell Latitude E6420 laptop, in the domain, bitlockered. The laptop case has problems so I want to take the HDD out and put it in another E6420 so the user has no down time while her laptop is repaired. Both laptops have hard drives and are bitlockered. First I suspended bitlocker on both laptops. I then swapped the drives. It comes up to repair. I run repair but it cannot repair and shuts down. I put the hard drives back in the original laptops, booted up, turned OFF bitlocker and waited for decryption. When finished, I again swapped the drives. Same issue. What am I doing wrong?

Answer:Swapping bitlocker system drive to another laptop

cdubaz, sorry I am not a bitlocker person but something tells me that you will have problems swapping drives with bitlocker
enabled. I would make a really good backup before you swap the drives. I am not 100% sure but believe that bitlocker uses
some the system checkpoints for part of it's encryption so that people can't decrypt stolen drives..

Rich

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I burned the ATI graphic chip on my Elitebook 8560p and planning to buy an identical notebook to start immediately with my old hard drive (win 7 pro 64).

Now I see I could purchase a QM-67 646966 UMA motherboard (Intel HD Graphics 3000) in substitution of the original QM-67 646967 discrete (Radeon HD 6470M) instead. Both are documented by HP for legit use in EliteBook 8560p computers.


Can I expect to start almost immediately with the new board or there are major problems related ie to BIOS setup, Win activation, video driver, etc?? Thanks a lot!

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Hi
I have installed a new hard drive on my Win 7 PC as my existing hard drive was becoming very noisy. Having used Macrium Reflect to clone the current drive to my new one I now want to make the new hard drive the boot drive. However, the Competer Manager under Control Panel will not let me change the drive letter (C) of the old drive so that I can designate the new one as Boot C.
Can any helpful person out there advise me how to go about this please?
Many thanks

Answer:Swapping old boot drive for a new hard drive

As you have cloned the drive just disconnect the old drive and boot computer with new drive.

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Relevance 61.91%

My skt A motherboard and processor died so I'm switching over to skt 939 and I'm wondering if the boot hard drive would work since I really don't want to reinstall windows and delete everything on the drive
 

Answer:swapping motherboard and using the old systems boot hard drive

It should work just fine. The os should recognize the new mobo after you replace and boot the system. You might need to install drivers from the mobo cd if for some reason the os doesnt install all the nescesary drivers. I dont see any problem from a hardware standpoint. If you're running XP (likely) it might void the product activation. I'm not exacly sure about this but I believe that changing out a major component can require reactivation. Anyone else know about this??
 

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I need to swap a SATA boot drive from an M58e sff to an M58p tower. When I do, the M58p keeps cycling through safe mode. Any ideas on how I can do this? I want to avoid duplicating the programs and data on the M58e boot drive. Thank you. mhein50

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I have an R61e that has a broken frame. Not a broken left hinge, but a broken frame where the left hinge connects. I have an opportunity to buy a used one with no OS.They both are type 7650 and both have 80GB hard drive. Will it work if I just swap this HDD with the operating system over to the new laptop?













Solved!

Go to Solution.

Answer:Swapping hard drive and operating system between two R61e laptops

Yes, it should work with no major issues.
 
In the worst case scenario you'll have to update a couple of drivers.
 
Good luck.

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I wanted to do a dual boot up for win98se and w2k. Found instructions online to do it and when it came time to setup the partition for w2k I could not make another partition for w2k. So , I ended up putting on the same partition as win98se. When I boot up I do the the choice of which os to boot to, and have no problem getting into win98se or w2k. But, shouldn' win98se and w2k be in separate partitions?? If so, then how to I do that now?? Do I have to stasrt from scratch??
 

Answer:Setup dual boot, but both os ended up on same partition?? Still get choice at boot up

Re: Setup dual boot, but both os ended up on same partition?? Still get choice at boo

As far as I know Win2k is unique in that it will allow a second version of Windows on the same partition. I think you're good just like it is.
 

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Guys..!!! i was trying installing xp sp3 in xp..!!! got a fatal error (Boot Manager not found) which left me a dual boot menu, ie

"Which os u want to run
Xp professional
Xp professional setup "

now i installed win 7, thnx to a software named "EASYBCD" got rid of XP but still it shows dual boot..!!

now

Windows7
Xp professional Setup

how to get ride of this setup frm boot
can any1 help me...????

i havn't isntalled the os in different drives..!! everthing was i C drive
eventhought i deleted the windows.old folder..!! which contained the xp files.

How to get rid of this Xp professional setup frm the boot guys..??

Answer:Dual Boot ( Xp professional Setup with Win7 ) in boot menu

Please post back a screenshot of your full Disk Management drive map with listings, using Snipping Tool ni STart Menu.

Do you remember which partition you tried to install XP upon? Normally you would just delete that partition in Disk Management, providing it is not already System Active. So let us see the Disk Mgmt screenshot, and tell us what is on each partition.

EasyBCD does not get rid of the partial XP install you have on there, just the boot listing. You still need to find and delete it from where it was installed.

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I've seen a similar problem in this forum, but I can't find the identical problem or a solution.

Simply stated, I made a copy of my w2k hard drive using ghost and when I try to boot to it, I get an error to the effect that the page file is missing or too small. Safe mode doesn't work either.

Read on for more details. I have also posted this to Western Digital and am awaiting an answer from them.

I want to install my new drive as my master because I believe I am having errors with my existing drive.

I have a master drive (C: ) and a slave (F: ). Most of the data on the slave got there by running the drive to drive copy (not the install new drive) selection from data lifeguard (Western Digital utility).

Because I learned in the past that I cannot successfully boot from the copy made by data lifeguard, I used Norton Ghost (version 10.0) to copy from my old master to the new drive. Ghost has an option that says it can be used to install a new drive.

I'm pretty sure I kept the jumpers and physical drive locations straight through all of this. Here is where I am at. I was careful.

If I try to boot from the new drive as master with no slave, the boot fails. It tells me the paging file is missing or too small. I do not have this problem booting from my old master with no slave. In both cases the slave is physically disconnected. If I attempt safe mode with the new drive, I have the same problem.

If I boot from the new drive with the existing F: (created by... Read more

Answer:Can't boot to hard drive copy - no pagefile & drive letters confused

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This happened about two days ago. By going in chronological order:

I used to have a dual-boot setup, a Windows 7 and Windows 8 on two different IDE 80GB hard drives, named Drive A and Drive B, respectively. Both of these hard drives are quite old, and I'm worried that it may be near the end of their life spans.

After buying a new SATAIII 500GB hard drive, named Drive C, I decided that I want to keep Windows 8, and scrap Windows 7 (I like Windows 8, but I digress). So, I burned a CD containing Parted Magic, boot the Live CD, used GParted to copy the System Reserved partition from Drive A (all 100MB of it) onto Drive C. A few restarts afterwards reminded that me that I need to also copy the Windows 8 partition (74.59GB) from Drive B onto Drive C.

Then I removed Drive A (with Windows 7 intact) and kept Drive B in. And this is where I am as of now. I've currently booted into Drive C (meaning that I'm booting the Windows 8 partition that was copied from Drive B to Drive C), and here's what it looks like:

(Can't tell if the image is working, or it's being resized locally on this forum.)

Now, my problem is that if I were to remove Drive B (the IDE 80GB one, if you're following me), Windows 8 in Drive C will crash upon logging in with my account. It is unable to load anything or even provide basic features, such as shutting down, restart, etc. I believed it's because Drive B is labeled as Volume C; If I remove Drive B, Volume D (Windows 8 in Drive C, the 500GB one) wouldn't ex... Read more

Answer:Dual-Boot setup -> Single Boot: How do I fix Windows 8?

How to clone your IDE drive to a SATA drive.
How to Migrate OS to new Hard disk.

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Relevance 60.68%

Okay, maybe I'm missing something, but I'm in a quandary: I have had my XP computer for awhile, works great though I can always use RAM, eh? My boot drive C has now gotten dangerously low on space, and I have removed everything that could possible save space. I have two other drives in the computer I can use. Is there a way to change the drive letters of one of the other drives and completely transfer the data from the C drive to one of them, thus making the new drive the main, boot drive? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Answer:altering drive letters - C: (boot) drive too small

Prebuilt or custom case there? What sizes of drives are you working with? The way I would do that fast here(for custom not prebuilt) is to temporarily unplug the present host and setup one of the larger drives as the new host/OS drive to later copy what files are needed to it.

Changing drive letter designations is done while booted into Windows. All but the OS drive can see the drive letters changed. The drive Windows is installed onto should always be seen as C unless something went sideways during the installation like boot information lingering on the wrong drive.

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..Hey gang..built my daughter a system for Xmas which is not going to be 100% I guess, but close..I built a dual-hard drive system one for the kids and one for her to do graphics work..I installed a spinner sata with Win 7 for kids and an SSD with Win 8.1 for her..installed 7 first and then 8 and things were fine, Win 8 would give me a nice screen asking me which OS I wanted to boot to.. but then the spinner started blue screening and grinding so I changed the hd and of course it screwed my boot up and I don't know alot about mbr's and that kind of thing but downloaded EasyBCD and was able to fumble my way through it to luckily get Win 8 back but here's my problem..When I shut down in Win 7 everything is fine as when I start it up I get a bios like screen asking me which OS I want to boot to..but when I shut down in Win 8 it automatically boots back to Win 8 without asking...I have to "restart" to get to the OS choice screen..I don't want to go messing around much further here without some direction as googling my way around miraculously saved me the first time but this problem is a little too convoluted to try and research on my own...Any suggestions greatly appreciated..merry xmas all!

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Hello all, this is my first post here. I have found many of my answers to other questions here without the need to ask but now I have a problem that I could not find here.

I had Windows installed to the first partition on my drive (which is C:\) and after a few years now it's gotten full
of software I don't use anymore and the like. Rather than install Windows over it and starting over, I decided to install to another partition and get everything set up before doing away with the old one.

I got Windows installed and mostly everything I use installed and working. My plan was to create an image of this copy and clone it back to the original partition. That was my plan until I realized I had screwed up majorly. The second installation of Windows says it's installed to F:\ (I'm not sure why, since I thought each version of Windows installed sees itself as C:\). Maybe because I started the installation from the other copy of Windows instead of booting straight to the install CD.

Now my question is... Is there any way to make this copy think of the drive it's installed on as C:\ or will I be stuck cloning it to a drive labeled F:\? Thinking about it, it doesn't seem possible considering everything is looking to F:\ instead of C:\ on this installation. I thought I'd ask just for the sake of it, possibly someone could be able to help.

Here is an image of my drive setup. C:\ is the old copy (where I want F:\ to go)

http://i.imgur.com/FWD219d.jpg

I'm sorry if my problem is not ... Read more

Answer:Changing system drive letters

Since you installed from winithin old win7.... C letter was already used. Next time install from DVD to make it letter C! But it's not a problem at all if it's called F!! Everything works and is pointing to letter F. So don't change that drive letter.

You want to get rid of old win7 (C)? C has still the boot manager and bootmenu btw!
Please post disk management screenshot again so I can see the used/free space as well.
What is on J (Downloads)? Just downloads?

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Question: Dual Boot Setup

I want to create a dual boot setup with Windows 10 and Windows 7. I have some older video processing applications which will not run with Windows 10. One, in particular, is no longer produced, but does an excellent job.

I read a lot of articles on the web and browsed hundreds of posts here. Nearly all are about adding Windows 10 after Windows 7. I want to do the reverse. I want to make that clear, to avoid any confusion.

Here, I have my quandary. I have a single 1TB HD which I can split into two volumes. I also have a separate 500 GB drive in the system. I am leaning towards using the separate drive because if Windows 10 goes haywire, as it has done before, the chances of it affecting a separate drive would be less, I would think. Also, Acronis TrueImage may not let me restore one partition, or the other, individually.

In either case the Secure Boot Manager will not let the system boot with Windows 7 DVD, even when it is not at the top of the list in the BIOS. I suppose I could simply disable it, but then, the system might not be aware of the changes being made.

So, I am needing some guidance. I've never done anything like this before, and I want to get it right on the first try.

Thank you!

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Question: Dual Boot Setup

Hello,

Im currently running a really basic setup, I have WinXP and Dos installed and when I boot up my machine I have a choice beetween the two. However now id like to add Win98SE as well. All I need to know is if I install 98SE normally, onto the harddrive will I recieve any problems? What do I need to look out for and be weary of :P

Thanks in advance!
-Dan

Answer:Dual Boot Setup

If you already have a dual boot menu with XP and dos, i would just install 98 in the dos partition. you still have access to dos by restarting in dos mode, and you wont have to mess with your boot.ini file to allow triple booting.

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Question: Dual Boot Setup

Hello all, I am running Windows XP PE on a NTFS hard drive and I have a 40 gig FAT32 as my slave. I want to put 98 SE on the 40 gig and want to have it set up so I can choose which OS from startup. I have two questions about this. First, how do I set that up? Second, will 3gigs of DDR still cause 98 not to load right? I tried just 98 with the 3 gigs before and it wouldent load because of the ram limit, do I need to remove ram everytime I want to start 98? I am doing this because I want to play a few older games that I have, Requiem, Command & Conquer, Ect. Thanks much for any help you can offer.
 

Answer:Dual Boot Setup

It's best to install 98 1st, then xp (or w2k) for this type of dual boot (unless you opt for booting from either drive via bios and not boot ini.).

98 likes 512ram otherwise you'll have to do some adjustments:
Win 9x is theoretically capable of recognizing and using up to 2GB of physical RAM. However, because of the way it configures itself based on available RAM, it actually shoots itself in the foot when RAM goes beyond 512MB, and will not work properly at all with more than 1GB.

The workaround for systems with between 512MB and 1GB of RAM is to add (or change) the MaxFileCache setting in the [vcache] section of SYSTEM.INI to limit the amount of memory allocated to the cache manager. This is addressed in MSKB article Q253912.

For systems with more than 1GB RAM, the workaround is to add (or edit) the MaxPhysPage setting in the [386enh] section of SYSTEM.INI to limit the amount of physical RAM that Windows will actually use to 1GB or less. This is addressed in MSKB article Q304903.
 

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Hi. I have a dual-boot setup with w98se on c: and xp on d:. Also on that physical HDD is a third partition for storage. I then have several other drives inside and usb-attached to the machine, including a dvd burner that I might use for backup as I do this (??). I don't need the old OS anymore and would like to reclaim that partition, to get rid of the old Windows 98 and have xp only. I do NOT want to have to re-establish my current xp setup with all the wireless networking setups and software configurations in general I'd then have to re-build.

The option of doing nothing is OK for now. XP boots fine and the only problem is that the old OS is holding space I could use, but don't desperately need. It's just that I never use the old OS anymore; I am totally "migrated" to the newer OS. (That is I already dumped and replace the perfectly good hardware that xp won't support...)

I have Partition Magic v.8 on the machine. If I can use this to dump that whole partition and move all the D: stuff to the newly created setup, that would be good to know. But any help will be greatly appreciated. I repeat that I do not want to have to re-install and re-configure xp, but would like to "move" the existing xp setup to c: after I have got rid of the old stuff.

FYI, I am NOT comfortable messing around in the registry, but will go that route if that's my only recourse, and if I can find VERY explicit instructions that apply to my situation on... Read more

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Hi,I have a pc running windows xp pro. I want to try and install a Linux os as well. I have come across Ubuntu and like the look of it.I have a 160GB hard drive. What do I need to do to setup a dual boot system so i can choose windows xp or Ubuntu when I boot up. Are there any pitfalls and is it easy to do.Thanks

Answer:How to dual boot setup for a pc

I have recently installed Xandros Linux on an older PC also running 98SE. By default it loads Linux OS but there is an option to load 98SE instead on boot up. When I installed Linux I took the option to keep 98SE as well. I would imagine your installation would give the same options.

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Question: Dual boot setup

I have a dual boot system setup. One each on it's own partition. I would like to delete 1 so it will free up the hard drive space for the other. How do I go about doing this. One OS is server 2000 and the other is server 2003.

cheers
 

Answer:Dual boot setup

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Question: Dual Boot setup

I have 3 hard drives in my computer. One for Windows XP Professional, one for Windows 7 Ultimate and one just for storage. My question is can I change my Windows 7 installation to 64 bit and still be able to run XP?

Answer:Dual Boot setup

Short answer is YES, you'll have to do a clean install of the 64 bit os with all new drivers but then XP will work just as it did before

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How do you create a dual boot system to run XP and Vista?
 

Answer:How to setup dual boot

go ahead and install xp first, then install vista on a different partition (can be same drive). restart and the vista boot manager will recognize the existance of both installs and everytime you turn on ure comp ull get a choice, either vista or old windows version (aka XP)...
 

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Hi, I just got a new thinkpad x31 and it has a 40gig HD. I have windows and norton installed and fully patched and everything just how I want it. Now I just got a 60gig from my friend and setup a 5gig partition for Ubuntu on it. My question is 2 parts. 1) Can I somehow transfer my windows XP install from my 40gig to my 60 gig w/o hooking up both hard drives? 2) Can I somehow shrink my 40gig windows partition down to like 5? This way I can have 5gig linux partition 10gig for Windows and games/apps and then set aside 45 for storage. I know for the storage to be accessible by both nix and windows it has to be (I believe) FAT32 but I think also read something about not being able to format FAT32 drives over 30 gigs? I am sure there are tons of different methods for accomplishing this but I really dont know where to start besides doing a fresh install of linux/windows on the 60 which I would like to avoid.
thanks
 

Answer:how to setup my dual boot?

you really need a laptop hard drive adapter to plug it into a normal pc to transfer the windows install over to the other drive. As far as dual booting goes there are tons of options. You can use ntloader to boot to your ubuntu partition. It just takes time and reading. I suggest combing over the ubuntu forums. www.ubuntuforums.org that should help you find out how to use ntloader if you want to go that route. I personally do not like using grub or lilo to be loaded into the mbr of the drive containing windows. I'd prefer to have linux on a seperate drive if I'm going to do that, so it can be loaded into the mbr on that drive, and I can simply switch my boot order back and forth in the bios.

Its all how you want it to be, as far as dual booting goes.

HAVING to have fat32 to be accessible from linux is false. Linux can read ntfs just fine, but its not very safe to be writing. I've had plenty of luck with reading ntfs, so I can play back my mp3s and such. my pr0n of course
 

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Question: Dual Boot Setup

I occassionaly help other residents here at this Assisted Care Facility. Several of them have asked about getting another operating system because of the demise of Win XP.
In this regard, I am thinking of familiarizing myself with a second operatring sytem. I am thinking of dual booting an Ubuntu system. My computer has plenty of space on the hard drive for this. I am running W7 Ultimate without any hardware problems.So, I would expect the computetr to support installing another operating sysytem.
What do you guys think?

Bill

Answer:Dual Boot Setup

Good move Bill.

There are 2 ways to do a dual boot of Linux:

1. To the same hard disk - complex
2. To a separate hard disk - easier

The second option also has the added benefit, of it something goes wrong, the Windows installation is not affected in the least - as a Linux beginner, i would recommend this route.

There are a good few free Linux distributions. Some are complex, others not. Those that mimic the Windows functionality to a large degree are LinuxMint and Zorin.

Zorin actually has a useful function to make the entire desktop look and behave like either XP or Windows 7 (incl. a classic Start menu)

I would suggest trying Zorin first.

With an XP look & feel:

With a Windows 7 look & feel:

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Hi all!!

I currently am running a dual boot system with XP and 98SE. I have two hard drives, a 40G and a 120G. The 40 G is partitioned into two 20G sections.

The layout is as follows:

C: - 20 G partition of 40G drive - Win 98SE
D: - 120 G drive - Win XP
E: - 20G partition of 40G drive

All drives are FAT 32

I would like to upgrade the 98SE to ME, but I REALLY do not want to have to reformat the 120G drive. I have a LOT of stuff on there!

I tried to format the C drive but to no avail. XP would not let me format either C or E drive, and when I boot by floppy the only drives that DOS can see is the E drive which it designates as C.

I used windows explorer to delete the contents of C and E drive, but Windows ME says that C drive is an invalid file format and will not allow me to install.

How can I format C drive and install Windows ME without having to reformat my 120 G drive?

Any help is greatly appreciated!

Regards,

Darren.
 

Answer:Please help with my Dual Boot setup

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Question: Dual boot setup

Hi, Is setting up a dual boot system just a case of creating a new partition and putting a new o.s. on the new partition or is there a little more to it than that.Thanx in advance Chris

Answer:Dual boot setup

Yes, bascially that is all there is to it.Depends though on, firstly, what OS you currently have installed, and secondly, what OS you want to install.If you have Win95/98/Me then you can install 2k / XP easily.In general, the older OS goes on first.

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My system is a dual boot ME/WIN 2K system. I used Western Digital's Data Lifeguard to try to clone my existing hard drive to a new larger one. I did this under WIN 2K and in the process, I think that my WIN 2K boot drive designation got changed. Microsoft has a tech note about this (249321 Unable to log on if the boot partition drive letter has changed) but as usual their solution is complicated and confusing. The end result is that I cannot boot WIN 2K on either drive. Anybody have any ideas as to how I can get into the WIN2K registry and change my drive letters back if I can't boot WIN 2k (I can boot ME just fine, but I don't know if I can use that to edit the WIN 2K registry).
 

Answer:WIN 2K drive letters changed and now won't boot

Try booting from an MS-DOS boot floppy. At the command prompt, type:

FDISK /MBR

This removes the signature that tells Windows what drive letter was assigned to the disk.
 

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